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Salvaje Army Customs

Over the last few years Salvaje Army has been growing into its skin. We are a veteran owned business that supports veterans and our military. We are a small shop that turns guns, motorcycle, parts, and most items from good to amazing. We specialize in hydro graphics, Cerakote coatings. If you have something that needs restored, and brought back to life than check us out.

On this day September 4, 2004

On this day  Insurgents clashed with American and Iraqi troops in northern Iraq. A suicide attacker detonated a car bomb outside a police academy in the northern city of Kirkuk as hundreds of trainees and civilians were leaving for the day, killing 17 people and wounding 36. Saboteurs blew up an oil pipeline in southern Iraq.

I can vouch anytime I traveled through a police checkpoint I was nervous. It was not uncommon for the police to bomb themselves for money and fear from the other side. They go to work and dig a hole and put a mine or IED in the hole and it detonates and kills cops and civilians. They were good at it and it was always an uneasy feeling going through them.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2014/09/04/september-4/

On this day September 3, 1939

On this day In response to Hitler’s invasion of Poland, Britain and France, both allies of the overrun nation declare war on Germany. The first casualty of that declaration was not German-but the British ocean liner Athenia, which was sunk by a German U-30 submarine that had assumed the liner was armed and belligerent. There were more than 1,100 passengers on board, 112 of whom lost their lives. Of those, 28 were Americans, but President Roosevelt was unfazed by the tragedy, declaring that no one was to “thoughtlessly or falsely talk of America sending its armies to European fields.” The United States would remain neutral. As for Britain’s response, it was initially no more than the dropping of anti-Nazi propaganda leaflets-13 tons of them-over Germany. They would begin bombing German ships on September 4, suffering significant losses. They were also working under orders not to harm German civilians. The German military, of course, had no such restrictions. France would begin an offensive against Germany’s western border two weeks later. Their effort was weakened by a narrow 90-mile window leading to the German front, enclosed by the borders of Luxembourg and Belgium-both neutral countries. The Germans mined the passage, stalling the French offensive.

I wonder if there is any similarities between Roosevelt not wanting to get involved in the war compared to the UN not wanting to help Ukraine. The fear of it sparking another world war. I am sure that was what President Roosevelt was thinking. It has been shown that he was for the people during his time as president. I can imagine that he was upset about the 28 Americans who died that day.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/september-3/

On this day September 2, 1945

On this day Aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan formally surrenders to the Allies, bringing an end to World War II. By the summer of 1945, the defeat of Japan was a foregone conclusion. The Japanese navy and air force were destroyed. The Allied naval blockade of Japan and intensive bombing of Japanese cities had left the country and its economy devastated. At the end of June, the Americans captured Okinawa, a Japanese island from which the Allies could launch an invasion of the main Japanese home islands. U.S. General Douglas MacArthur was put in charge of the invasion, which was code-named “Operation Olympic” and set for November 1945. The invasion of Japan promised to be the bloodiest seaborne attack of all time, conceivably 10 times as costly as the Normandy invasion in terms of Allied casualties. On July 16, a new option became available when the United States secretly detonated the world’s first atomic bomb in the New Mexico desert. Ten days later, the Allies issued the Potsdam Declaration, demanding the “unconditional surrender of all the Japanese armed forces.” Failure to comply would mean “the inevitable and complete destruction of the Japanese armed forces and just as inevitable the utter devastation of the Japanese homeland.” On July 28, Japanese Prime Minister Kantaro Suzuki responded by telling the press that his government was “paying no attention” to the Allied ultimatum. U.S. President Harry Truman ordered the devastation to proceed, and on August 6, the U.S. B-29 bomber Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, killing an estimated 80,000 people and fatally wounding thousands more. After the Hiroshima attack, a faction of Japan’s supreme war council favored acceptance of the Potsdam Declaration, but the majority resisted unconditional surrender. On August 8, Japan’s desperate situation took another turn for the worse when the USSR declared war against Japan. The next day, Soviet forces attacked in Manchuria, rapidly overwhelming Japanese positions there, and a second U.S. atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese coastal city of Nagasaki. Just before midnight on August 9, Japanese Emperor Hirohito convened the supreme war council. After a long, emotional debate, he backed a proposal by Prime Minister Suzuki in which Japan would accept the Potsdam Declaration “with the understanding that said Declaration does not compromise any demand that prejudices the prerogatives of His Majesty as the sovereign ruler.” The council obeyed Hirohito’s acceptance of peace, and on August 10 the message was relayed to the United States. Early on August 12, the United States answered that “the authority of the emperor and the Japanese government to rule the state shall be subject to the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers.” After two days of debate about what this statement implied, Emperor Hirohito brushed the nuances in the text aside and declared that peace was preferable to destruction. He ordered the Japanese government to prepare a text accepting surrender. In the early hours of August 15, a military coup was attempted by a faction led by Major Kenji Hatanaka. The rebels seized control of the imperial palace and burned Prime Minister Suzuki’s residence, but shortly after dawn the coup was crushed. At noon that day, Emperor Hirohito went on national radio for the first time to announce the Japanese surrender. In his unfamiliar court language, he told his subjects, “we have resolved to pave the way for a grand peace for all the generations to come by enduring the unendurable and suffering what is insufferable.” The United States immediately accepted Japan’s surrender. President Truman appointed MacArthur to head the Allied occupation of Japan as Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers. For the site of Japan’s formal surrender, Truman chose the USS Missouri, a battleship that had seen considerable action in the Pacific and was named after Truman’s native state. MacArthur, instructed to preside over the surrender, held off the ceremony until September 2 in order to allow time for representatives of all the major Allied powers to arrive. On Sunday, September 2, more than 250 Allied warships lay at anchor in Tokyo Bay. The flags of the United States, Britain, the Soviet Union, and China fluttered above the deck of the Missouri. Just after 9 a.m. Tokyo time, Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu signed on behalf of the Japanese government. General Yoshijiro Umezu then signed for the Japanese armed forces, and his aides wept as he made his signature. Supreme Commander MacArthur next signed on behalf of the United Nations, declaring, “It is my earnest hope and indeed the hope of all mankind that from this solemn occasion a better world shall emerge out the blood and carnage of the past.” Ten more signatures were made, by the United States, China, Britain, the USSR, Australia, Canada, France, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, respectively. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz signed for the United States. As the 20-minute ceremony ended, the sun burst through low-hanging clouds. The most devastating war in human history was over.

Living in Missouri, I felt the need to post this one. I mean the last of the troops surrendering to the USS Missouri is a pretty big deal and should be talked about.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/september-2/

On this day September 1, 1983

On this day Soviet jet fighters intercept a Korean Airlines passenger flight in Russian airspace and shoot the plane down, killing 269 passengers and crewmembers. The incident dramatically increased tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States. On September 1, 1983, Korean Airlines (KAL) flight 007 was on the last leg of a flight from New York City to Seoul, with a stopover in Anchorage, Alaska. As it approached its final destination, the plane began to veer far off its normal course. In just a short time, the plane flew into Russian airspace and crossed over the Kamchatka Peninsula, where some top-secret Soviet military installations were known to be located. The Soviets sent two fighters to intercept the plane. According to tapes of the conversations between the fighter pilots and Soviet ground control, the fighters quickly located the KAL flight and tried to make contact with the passenger jet. Failing to receive a response, one of the fighters fired a heat-seeking missile. KAL 007 was hit and plummeted into the Sea of Japan. All 269 people on board were killed. This was not the first time a South Korean flight had run into trouble over Russia. In 1978, the Soviets forced a passenger jet down over Murmansk; two passengers were killed during the emergency landing. In its first public statement concerning the September 1983 incident, the Soviet government merely noted that an unidentified aircraft had been shot down flying over Russian territory. The United States government reacted with horror to the disaster. The Department of State suggested that the Soviets knew the plane was an unarmed civilian passenger aircraft. President Ronald Reagan called the incident a “massacre” and issued a statement in which he declared that the Soviets had turned “against the world and the moral precepts which guide human relations among people everywhere.” Five days after the incident, the Soviets admitted that the plane had indeed been a passenger jet, but that Russian pilots had no way of knowing this. A high ranking Soviet military official stated that the KAL flight had been involved in espionage activities. The Reagan administration responded by suspending all Soviet passenger air service to the United States, and dropped several agreements being negotiated with the Soviets. Despite the heated public rhetoric, many Soviets and American officials and analysts privately agreed that the incident was simply a tragic misunderstanding. The KAL flight had veered into a course that was close to one being simultaneously flown by a U.S. spy plane; perhaps Soviet radar operators mistook the two. In the Soviet Union, several of the military officials responsible for air defense in the Far East were fired or demoted. It has never been determined how the KAL flight ended up nearly 200 miles off course.

I vagally remember this as a kid. It is crazy considering that most air defense systems have the ability to detect a signal from civil air craft that detects it as friend or foe. The other thing that is crazy is the flight number. This was flight 007 so was James bond on this flight and was it just a civilian flight flying over a top secret area in Russia. lol, I am just playing with the James Bond stuff. The truth is this was a very unnecessary thing to do. Lots of civilians died for no reason here.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/september-1/

On this day August 31, 1940

On this day 56 U-boats were sunk this month (268,000 ton).

Credit for image: https://www.history.com/news/u-boats-world-war-i-germany

If you can imagine 280000 tons of metal at the bottom of the ocean, Imagine the amount of military personnel that was on the submarine and now at the bottom of the ocean. The average number of personnel on a U boat is 35. This war not only had a fighting on the land but had a tremendous amount of fighting in the water.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2005/09/01/august-31/

On this day August 30, 1996

On this day The United States presents evidence to the U.N. Sanctions Committee that Iran is complicit in the smuggling of petroleum products from Iraq through the Persian Gulf. According to U.S. allegations, Iran uses barges and small ships to carry oil products from southern Iraq into Iranian territorial waters. Shipping documents then are forged to show that the cargo is of Iranian origin.

It is no secret on how I feel about the United Nations. I feel like we invest way to much money and Soldiers for this organization, compared to the other countries. We get very little support and spend billions of dollars. This is another example of an agency that has gotten too big and feel like they are in charge of our military.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2005/08/30/august-30/

Just shaking my head

As I sit here I really didn’t know what the title should be. I’m waiting to go to work looking through the news articles to read bull shit.

One article reads Ozzy Osborne is leaving America. In the article it says he is tired of the mass shootings. He is selling his house in California for 18 million dollars. Not two months ago he stated he was leaving California do you high taxes. We’ll I wonder if hiring 87000 IRS agents had anything to do with him wanting to go back to England. If he really is leaving from all of the mass shootings, I ask why can’t you give back to a country that has gave you so much. So many people has lived his music to include me. I never thought someone would turn there back on a country that has supported him so much. With all the money and influence you have you can’t help do something to stop it.

The answer doesn’t start with money it starts with people asking questions. Put your political views apart and start doing what the people did to build this country. The government will not fix this problem. They will continue to profit from it. You look at how much money was spent to benefit this government. The first question should be, what are you doing to protect our children? I promise you the security at congress and senate will be increased after Jan 6. Do you not think that costs money?

I just really wish people would think and start relying on each other to fix problems. As a veteran I know you can’t rely on our government, however history has shown you can rely on the American people.

We have came together during so many times of need. From 9-11 to ww1 and 2. National disasters that has effected people you didn’t know, but wanted to help. Do you not think the things going on in our country isn’t something that we should rely on each other to fix versus a government that does not listen.

On this day August 29, 1952

On this day In the largest bombing raid of the Korean War, 1,403 planes of the Far East Air Force bombed Pyongyang, North Korea. Can you imagine being in this town when 1400 planes come and drop bombs on you. I can only imagine the civilian casualties that was taken that day.

A lot of people don’t know how many operations still to this day take place between North and South Korea. When I was over there in 1995 there was times that south Korean troops were snuck across the boarder, and vice versa.

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Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2005/08/29/august-29/

On this day August 28, 1941

On this day With the nation on the verge of entering World War II and prices threatening to skyrocket, the government chose to take action against inflation. On this day, President Franklin Roosevelt handed down an executive order establishing the Office of Price Administration (OPA). Charged with controlling consumer prices in the face of war, the OPA wheeled into action, imposing rent controls and a rationing program which initially targeted auto tires. Soon, the agency was churning out coupon books for sugar, coffee, meat, fats, oils, and numerous other items. Though goods were in tight supply, Americans were urged to stick to the system of rationing. Some even took the Homefront Pledge, a declaration of their commitment to avoiding the black market in favor of buying the OPA way. The end of the war didn t prompt an instant shutdown of the OPA. Reasoning that some goods were still quite scarce, President Truman kept the agency running. However, the existence of a government agency for regulated prices and production didn’t sit well with some people. Big business bristled at the controls, as did farmers, who suffered under continued meat rationing. Soon after the ’46 election, the OPA was relieved of its duties, with only rents, sugar, and rice still subject to controls. The agency’s record of service during the war was fairly impressive: by V-J, consumer prices had increased by 31 percent, a number which was noticeably better than the 62 percent bloating of prices during World War I.

So you compare what President Roosevelt did for this country compared to what is happening for us and I think you will see how times have changed. I heard people from both sides say the bill that just passed to control inflation will do nothing for inflation. Most think it will make things worse by spending more money that we don’t have. I don’t think the people are in the best interest of the powers to be anymore.

I am not a fan of President Roosevelt, however you can’t say he wasn’t here for the people. He was the reason working conditions for factory workers improved. He is also the reason why the energy monopoly was stopped. The very rich and powerful put him in as a vice president to prevent him from becoming the president. It turned on them when he was made president by the death of President McKinley. I think he remembered who he worked for maybe its a lesson that needs relearned.

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This was another fun episode no script just our thoughts.

Credit to: https://thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/2005/08/29/august-28/